Bitcoin Scams are the World’s Other Continuing Pandemic

2020 BitcoinWhosWho.com Scam Report Origins

Based on the origins of Scam Reports received by BitcoinWhosWho.com in 2020, bitcoin scams are the world’s other continuing pandemic.

BitcoinWhosWho received Scam Reports from 149 countries in 2020. 25 countries originated at least 100 reports.

Continue reading Bitcoin Scams are the World’s Other Continuing Pandemic

The Most Frequently Reported Bitcoin Scams Of 2020

The Top 25 Most Frequently Reported Bitcoin Scam Addresses to BitcoinWhosWho.com in 2020* received 9.5994793 total BTC.

Every single address is associated with the “sextortion” email scam first reported here in March 2018. There are many variations of the scam, but basically claims to have webcam footage of the email recipient visiting adult websites and demands payment in bitcoin or else the video will be sent to their contacts.

The average amount scammed was .092 BTC.

Top 25 Most Frequently Reported Bitcoin Scam Addresses of 2020

Continue reading The Most Frequently Reported Bitcoin Scams Of 2020

Multi-Million Dollar Canadian Bitcoin Scam Using Binance

Scammer will provide a QR code and the location of the closest bitcoin ATM.

If you have been caught up in this scam, you have a better than average chance of recovering funds.

The first “CRA scam” was reported to BitcoinWhosWho.com in August 2018. Since then, there have been dozens of reports of this particular tactic and it continues to fool a lot of people.

The most frequently reported CRA scam, aka “SIN scam”, bitcoin address has received 567BTC (as of Sept 9), worth almost CAD$8M.

Based on input transactions to this address alone, it appears to be scamming 2 or 3 people a day out of ~.33 BTC a pop.

The fraud starts with a caller ID spoofing Service Canada, Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) or even sometimes reportedly the FBI. The caller claims there was fraudulent use of your Social Insurance Number (SIN) and only by visiting the closest crypto ATM and depositing BTC into their wallet (which they will conveniently text you a QR code for!) will they be able to “assist”. Don’t fall for it!

Continue reading Multi-Million Dollar Canadian Bitcoin Scam Using Binance

The RISE OF Elon MUSK BITCOIN SCAMS

The first “Elon Musk/Tesla” #Bitcoin scam reported to BitcoinWhosWho.com in June 2018 involved a hijacked high-profile verified Twitter account pretending to giveaway our beloved valuable crypto asset. Since then, the volume of Elon Musk (& Tesla) related bitcoin scams reported has increased dramatically, especially from Japan.

Elon Musk & Telsa Bitcoin Scam Report Volume

Almost 45% of Elon Musk/Tesla bitcoin scam reports come from Japan. 16% are unknown, 15% are US and the rest;

Continue reading The RISE OF Elon MUSK BITCOIN SCAMS

New CIA Child Porn Bitcoin Ransom EMAIL

The first report of a Central Intelligence Agency officer sending ransom emails demanding bitcoin in exchange for concealing evidence of child porn was received March 16. Since then dozens of similar reports have come in, each demanding $10K USD payment to a different multi-sig address. As of this posting none of the reported addresses have received ransom payments.

Continue reading New CIA Child Porn Bitcoin Ransom EMAIL

~2 BTC Burned in 2018

The number of bitcoin ever to be mined may be capped at 21 million but the total supply will always be less. How much less is a critical valuation metric for bitcoin economists. There are a variety of ways and reasons bitcoin can be taken out of circulation. The purpose of this post is to examine one reason: “burn addresses”.

2,761.352575 BTC burned all-time . 1.9 BTC burned in 2018 down from 8.9 in 2017.
Continue reading ~2 BTC Burned in 2018

Bitcoin Bomb Ransom Fizzled Out: No Payments Made By Deadline

There will be winners and losers in the race to become the best bitcoin extortionist emailer. The latest bitcoin scam email campaign looks like it will be one of the losers.

New Bitcoin Bomb Ransom Email A Fake

Starting this morning, from U.S. sources, BitcoinWhosWho.com began receiving reports of a fake bomb threat demanding $20k in bitcoin or a “mercenary” would blow up their building. So far no one has paid any of the 15 bitcoin addresses that have been identified. But, it would only take a few people falling for this to make it worthwhile for the scammer.

The email typically states the bomb or explosive device is made of “lead azide”, “Tetryl” or “Hexogen” but also “tronitrotoluene” has been reported.

Notably, the author really wants to be clear that everything is proceeding “according to my guide”. Oh, and BTW, the bomb will go off by the end of the day if you don’t pay.

Continue reading Bitcoin Bomb Ransom Fizzled Out: No Payments Made By Deadline